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In week after opening, Grove receives resident complaints

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The Grove student apartment complex in Grand Forks has received several complaints from residents, including concerning possible mold, since the apartments opened last weekend.

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Some residents said Monday that they were shocked by the condition of their apartments, saying there were holes in the walls, mud on the floors and broken appliances.

Property managers of the 42nd Street South complex emailed residents Tuesday to say they are working to address every concern on an apartment-by-apartment basis, including knocking on each resident’s door to ask about possible problems.

Additionally, the Grand Forks Public Health Department plans to inspect some Grove apartments for mold after receiving two complaints this week, said Javin Bedard, environmental health supervisor. If the complaints are true, the health department will inform Grove management, he said.

The city of Grand Forks Inspections Department also received one complaint, but Bev Collings, building and zoning administrator, said The Grove is up to city code for what her inspectors regulate.

The Inspections Department checks for safety, Collings said, and complaints of holes in the walls or messy apartments do not include anything that jeopardizes residents’ safety.

Eight of The Grove’s 13 buildings were deemed livable and ready for occupancy by last weekend, Collings said. The rest are still under construction.

Residents whose move-in has been delayed are being put up in a nearby hotel and provided with storage units until their apartments are ready, according to a Campus Crest company statement. The late move-in is due to “unanticipated construction delays,” the statement said.

Residents of The Grove pay for rent by bedroom and share common rooms in either two- or three-bedroom suites. The complex, geared toward residents, includes amenities like fitness rooms, study rooms and a game room.

Residents’ problems

Collin Senglaub, a sophomore at UND and a Grove resident, said he heard some parents screaming at apartment management on move-in day because their kids’ apartments weren’t clean or had other problems.

Senglaub and his roommate, sophomore William Ricci, both said their apartment had some problems, including a broken microwave, dust and trash in the apartment, and a broken water heater.

But both said Grove management has been quick to address their problems, and their water heater was already fixed Monday afternoon.

Neither Senglaub or Ricci was upset with Grove management.

“They’re nothing but apologetic,” Ricci said. He called the problems “just cosmetic things.”

Both students are still excited to be living in the Grove, surrounded by fellow students and close to campus.

“Some of it’s good, and some of it’s bad,” Ricci said.

In another resident’s apartment, paint was splattered on the door and dirt was on the walls and floor. Whistling wind could be heard through the door when it was closed.

The Grove’s email to students specifically stated management was following up on “painting concerns” in one building and “cleaning concerns” in two others.

“We will be moving systematically through the property in following weeks to continue completion on other buildings/apartments,” the email stated.

Other cities’ problems

Grand Forks is not the only city where Grove apartments have been criticized by residents.

There are 45 Grove apartment complexes across the U.S. Several other cities’ media have reported problems similar to Grand Forks, such as delayed move-in, messy apartments, broken appliances and mold.

Campus Crest’s headquarters has a D-minus rating with the Better Business Bureau due to numerous complaints.

In a company statement, Campus Crest has said it has quickly and properly addressed its problems in other cities.

About the complaints in Grand Forks, the company said, “We are working diligently to address all outstanding maintenance requests in a timely manner and continue to keep residents informed of our progress,” adding that residents are “top priority.”

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