WDAY.com

WDAZ: Your Home Team

Published January 13, 2012, 06:10 PM

Public Gets Chance to Sound Off On Proposed Postal Changes

DEVILS LAKE (WDAZ-TV) - The U.S. Postal Service is considering big cuts all over the country because income is not meeting expenses. Devils Lake is one city that could lose one-day service as a result.

By: Adam Ladwig, WDAZ

DEVILS LAKE (WDAZ-TV) - The U.S. Postal Service is considering big cuts all over the country because income is not meeting expenses. Devils Lake is one city that could lose one-day service as a result.

City leaders are trying to keep that from happening, but they say they need the public's assistance.

Devils Lake mayor Dick Johnson says proposed cuts to the US Postal service are almost un-American.

He says, "Our nation was founded from the old Pony Express, and that's mail service to the rural communities, and that was what our expansion was predicated on."

But that service is threatened in many places now, including Devils Lake. Devils Lake Chamber Executive Director Rich Brueckner says the area's growth is tied in to quick postal service.

Devils Lake especially, we're still a growing community, much similar to what Williston is experiencing with growth in their communities", Brueckner adds. "But one day mail service throughout North Dakota and North America is a key thing for business growth."

The Postal Service is still listening, and you can still send a letter to the Post Office voicing your concerns. The deadline for those comments is January 19th. Mayor Johnson says the city and county governments have already sent letters.

"We just let them know we're against any down-grading, down-sizing our facility and loss of jobs", Johnson says.

Devils Lake Postmaster Jeff Olson says the cuts would claim three jobs. Mayor Johnson says the cuts would cause more damage than that, affecting everything from businesses to seniors, as well as hurting the City's long term prospects.

The mayor is worried there may not be much public support for the Post Office because people feel the decision has already been made.

He explains, "Oftentimes it feels like our concerns are falling on deaf ears, and it's a concern."

But Brueckner is optimistic public outcry could have a positive effect, saying, "I do believe they are listening. Our congressional delegation is listening. Our legislators in a state level are listening, and supporting the program."

"And the point they hope people in the Lake Region make is short and sweet."

"Our rural areas around the Lake Region too suffer when service is degraded, and two or three day delivery's not acceptable", says Johnson.

Tags: