WDAY.com

WDAZ: Your Home Team

Published April 24, 2012, 09:59 PM

EGF City Leaders Look for 2nd Opinion on Sewage Solution

EAST GRAND FORKS, MN (WDAZ-TV) - The East Grand Forks City Council is putting life back into a project to fix the city's wastewater lagoons. A peer review from an outside company will help the council decide the best way to move forward.

EAST GRAND FORKS, MN (WDAZ-TV) - The East Grand Forks City Council is putting life back into a project to fix the city's wastewater lagoons.

A peer review from an outside company will help the council decide the best way to move forward.

In November East Grand Forks Mayor Lynn Stauss vetoed a waste water interconnect project that would have had the city sharing lagoons with Grand Forks.

Stauss is now proposing that the city seeks a second opinion and the city council agrees that they need to find the right solution.

"On this Council it'll be probably the highest amount of money they'll be spending on a project in the term that they're spending here. So I just want to make sure that we're doing it right and that we do the best thing for the tax payer," Stauss said.

The existing sewage lagoons in East Grand Forks are leaking. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is worried about waves from the lagoon eroding the banks.

"There's a possibility of an interconnect, possibility of building a new lagoon and adding on to it, or the third possibility is to repair what is leaking," Stauss said.

Both the council and the mayor agree they have to do something. The city's permit with the MPCA expires in 2016.

"If you do nothing between now and when your permit expires, they will put you into a compliance agreement. They will force you to do something," East Grand Forks City Engineer Gregg Boppre said.

So for $5,000 the city will have an outside company help it find financing options and the best solution for fixing the lagoon's problems.

"What we want to do is try to provide for our taxpayers the best alternative because this is long-reaching and it has an affect on their taxes for the future for many years to come," Stauss said.

In November it was predicted that an interconnect project would cost nearly $7.5 million.

If the city builds a new lagoon, that could cost upwards of $13.2 million.

Tags: