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Published June 13, 2012, 10:05 PM

After Measure 2's Defeat, City Projects Back On

GRAND FORKS (WDAZ-TV) - The majority of those who voted in Tuesday's primary election rejected Measure 2, which would have eliminated property taxes in North Dakota.

GRAND FORKS (WDAZ-TV) - The majority of those who voted in Tuesday's primary election rejected Measure 2, which would have eliminated property taxes in North Dakota.

The state would've been the first in the nation to eliminate the tax, but an overwhelming majority voted to keep it.

More than 131,000 people rejected Measure 2. That's roughly 76 percent who voted to keep property tax for the meantime.

Many city projects have been halted due to the possibility of property taxes being cut, but now City Engineer Al Grasser says business can resume as usual.

"We're very happy to know that we're now able to proceed with development I guess in our normal course of action," Grasser said.

With a short summer construction season here in the upper Midwest, there's now a hurry to get projects like street lighting, storm sewers and the building of new streets underway.

"Start moving forward and start getting those into the ground in July," Grasser said.

New streets aren't the only thing on the agenda either. The failure of Measure 2 will relieve some congestion in Grand Forks schools.

"Of course last night was successful in our opinions, so we're able to move forward with some of those preliminary plans now and get ready to put in full motion, the construction of the new elementary school," Assistant Superintendent Jody Thompson said.

Those like Dan Taylor who worked as an election judge last night, say some voters were nervous of the uncertainty measure 2 held, which was a main reason why voters came to the polls.

"Didn't say a whole lot of anything, they just said, 'Yep, that's why I'm here,'" election judge Dan Taylor said.

Although the state legislature claimed property tax would be replaced by other revenues, city leaders are unsure of what budgets would replace property tax revenue.

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