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Published October 19, 2010, 02:42 PM

Do Negative Political Ads Really Work?

Negative ads are pretty hard to miss, with the election only two weeks away. Some of the most negative political ads concern the race for North Dakota's U.S. House seat.

You've most likely seen dozens of negative political advertisements.

In fact, they're pretty hard to miss, with the election only two weeks away.

Some of the most negative political ads concern the race for North Dakota's U.S. House seat.

Polls have shown that it's very close between Democrat incumbent Earl Pomeroy and Republican Rick Berg.

The latest Rasmussen report found Berg earning 48 percent of the vote to Pomeroy's 45 percent.

One percent prefer some other candidate, while five percent aren't sure.

UND political science professor Robert Wood says studies show negative advertisements actually do work, especially for undecided voters.

"It's those undecided voters. It's those voters who haven't been paying attention to the race, that haven't had any issue that would sway them one way or another, and so you tend to see it near the end, and it tends to not have too much of an alienating effect on the people who have already made up their mind," Wood said.

Wood says while the U.S. House race has gotten dirty for North Dakota standards, it's not in relation to other states.

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