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Published August 14, 2011, 10:05 PM

Summer Rains Cause Headaches for Farmers

Finely, ND - Farmers near Cooperstown are hoping for a break from rain as they head into harvest.

By: David Schwab, WDAZ

Farmers near Cooperstown are hoping for a break from rain as they head into harvest. They have been hit with showers every few days going into August. We talked with one farmer whose only yield might be a check from his insurance company.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: "you have to laugh at it, otherwise

you would cry and be sick.”

What farmer James Law is talking about is this…his crops. This half of this field of soybeans is drown out; other fields are saturated from ten and a half inches of rain here since the beginning

of the month.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: "We have had six inches in the last three days. Never dried out between the rains and it just kept coming and now you get five or six inches at a time."

Law, who grew up here, says this the most rain he can remember.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: "The water has went over the road twice here and it's been twice this month. Since 59."

Many of the crop here have done ok despite it being a very wet year. However the problem still remains of getting the farm equipment into the field to get the crop out.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: "The ground is so soft we can't drive out to get any of it, so it really don't matter. The longer it sits out there. The quality goes down and pretty soon it isn't worth anything so it don't matter."

Things are so bad here, Law says the best thing that could happen to some farmers is a big hail storm. At least that would bring in money.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: "If they have hail insurance it would be a blessing for them then it's over. You know what you are going to get."

So for farmers here like Law, they will continue to do what they have done all summer…wait on the weather.

James Law - Farms Near Finley: “What do you do. You can't do nothing. If it's something we did

wrong or should have done different it's one thing."

Law says there is still a little time since his wheat is not quite ready for harvest, but he is not getting his hopes too high for things to dry.

Law says he'd need about three straight weeks with little or no rain to get into fields.

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