WDAY.com

WDAZ: Your Home Team

Published January 26, 2012, 06:40 PM

Is recent dry weather a sign of things to come?

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) - The flood outlook numbers didn't come as any surprise to state climatologists. In fact, this dry weather is coming off the longest wet period on record. But are we done with wet weather for the long term? Or is this just a hiccup?

The flood outlook numbers didn't come as any surprise to state climatologists. In fact, this dry weather is coming off the longest wet period on record. But are we done with wet weather for the long term? Or is this just a hiccup?

Despite just receiving several inches of snow in the Red River Valley over the weekend, state climatologists are no longer worried about if there will be a drought. Now they're concerned about when it will be end.

Dr. Adnan Akyuz – State Climatologist, NDSU: “Since the August second, it started drying and up and the soil started drying up and there was no moisture to supply moisture in the atmosphere so it could provide precipitation.”

Up until November 29th of this year, the state of North Dakota went 115 weeks without any drought conditions - a 21st century record. Now the entire state is covered in abnormally dry conditions, with much of the Red River Valley officially in a drought.

Dr. Adnan Akyuz: “The farmers asked for dryness from the previous three very wet periods, now they are getting it, and I am afraid they are getting too much of the dryness.”

But Akyuz believes this is only a bump in the road, and the wet cycle will eventually pick up again. For Fargo Mayor Dennis Walaker, a spring with wet conditions would mean a breath of fresh air and a chance to catch up.

Mayor Dennis Walaker - Fargo: “What the flood does, is puts us behind the 8 ball because all of the things they can normally work on can't be done because you are spending all your time and efforts on flood time. They need a year off, just like everybody.”

Akyuz blames the dryness on typical La Nina patterns. Those patterns usually lead to an abnormally wet spring, which could level the Red River Valley out to, dare I say, normal conditions.

Tags: