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Published February 21, 2011, 09:29 PM

UND Students React to Nickname Vote

UND students are divided in what should be done about the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. Monday's vote meant different things for different students. They're responding to this new development in what is becoming a Fighting Sioux tug of war.

UND students are divided in what should be done about the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. Spokesman Peter Johnson says the bill's passage in the house doesn't change the school's plans to retire the nickname and logo.

Monday's vote meant different things for different students. They're responding to this new development in what is becoming a Fighting Sioux tug of war.

"I think it's worth it in the end if we get to keep it...but it confuses and frustrates a lot of people," student Angie Curfman said.

Student athlete Tyler Rose feels that frustration.

"As long as the Sioux logo is there, athletes are being penalized," Rose said.

Rose, a captain of the men's track team, says his team has been ignored by other schools because they want to avoid being tied to the logo.

"The University of Minnesota, one of the biggest invites in the nation. Before the controversy, we were invited, no problem. We weren't invited the last two years," Rose said.

UND spokesman Peter Johnson says, despite Monday's vote from state leaders, it's still on its way out.

"I think it's in the best interest that we continue the process to retire it," Johnson said.

Johnson says the school is answering to the instructions from the board of higher education to meet the August 15th deadline.

"If the governor signs it into law, then we'll take that into account if that time comes," Johnson said.

Just like the North Dakota legislators, everyone sees it differently.

"It's like a little cloud over our heads," Rose said.

"I think a lot of students are very proud. I've never seen it portrayed in a negative way," Curfman said.

A UND task force is coming up with ways to keep the logo and nickname's history present on campus.

At their latest meeting, they were looking at how other schools retired a logo. Right now, preserving its history might include museum exhibits or even publications.

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