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Published February 24, 2011, 10:54 PM

ND House's Actions Could Mean Higher Tuition

The North Dakota House has already taken action that could mean higher tuition for university students. A bill that would eliminate funding aimed at tuition control has passed the House, and will now go to the Senate.

The North Dakota House has already taken action that could mean higher tuition for university students.

A bill that would eliminate funding aimed at tuition control has passed the House, and will now go to the Senate.

The House voted to eliminate $35 million for higher education. Now, students might be a few steps away from a tuition increase.

"I care a great deal about students here in Grand Forks and I don't want to see that happen," district 43 Democrat Lois Delmore said.

That's why Delmore voted no on a bill that could mean tuition increases for students like Maranda Jacobsen.

Jacobsen is majoring in special education at UND but also gets lessons in finance.

"I pay, usually about five to six thousand a semester, so it's like 12 thousand a year. Pretty costly," Jacobsen said.

It could get even more costly.

The North Dakota House voted 64 to 29 to cut nearly $35 million recommended by Governor Jack Dalrymple for higher education. In that sum, about $6.5 million in tuition reduction funds.

For students like Jacobsen, a nearly four percent tuition increase could be on the way.

"I feel like it's enough stress right now. It's going to rack up by the time I'm done with college," Jacobsen said.

"I think it's irresponsible, truly. It's important at a time when the state has a surplus..we invest in our future," UND student body vice president Grant Hauschild said.

Right now the bill is expected to go before the Senate. Hauschild says you can expect UND Student Government to vocalize its objections.

"We're not just sitting back and letting the older people take charge, but going there and being part of the process. Hopefully it will make a difference," Hauschild said.

Delmore says an increase in tuition could come down to an increase in conversation.

"We may see a lot more wagering and a lot more negotiating going on," Delmore said.

Delmore says the senate could look at an option to put money back in to help the tuition.

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